06282017Headline:

Washington, District of Columbia

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Matthew Nace
Matthew Nace
Attorney • (202) 930-0292

No Child Should Be Trapped Underwater in a Swimming Pool From Hair Entanglement

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Between 1990 and 2007, according to the Consumer Product Safety Commission, there were 98 cases of body entrapments in pools or spa drains, including 15 confirmed deaths.

As a result, in December of 2007, the United States Federal Government enacted the Virginia Graeme Baker Act, which detailed design methods to assure that pool drain injuries do not occur.  Since the enactment of the Virginia Graeme Baker Act, in today’s society hair entanglement in drain covers of swimming pools should never happen.  There is simply no excuse.  

The Virginia Graeme Baker Act is obviously a law enacted in the United States of America. Unfortunately, despite knowing better, many hotels around the world fail to live up to the Act’s standards, which are universally applicable to all swimming pools. As such, Americans should not forget while they are abroad, that some foreign governments may not enforce such standards as appropriately as the United States.  Recently, the Morgan Family was staying in a resort hotel in Spain when six-year-old Darcey’s hair became entangled in a pool filter.  

Thankfully for the Morgan Family, Darcey was rescued and survived after being trapped underwater for minutes.  This incident, however, helps to remind us that not all swimming pool owners and operators have taken the appropriate and simple steps to maintain a safe swimming pool.  For more information on pool safety, please visit the Consumer Product Safety Commission’s website and review their information.

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